Two-Color Pom-Pom DIY


I spend a lot of time with yarn, because it’s my job. When the January DIY Challenge from Adventures in Making was announced as being yarn, I was kind of excited but also didn’t know what to do because I didn’t want to just knit something.

I didn’t really want to crochet something, either, though I am suddenly thinking about crocheted hearts.

I started to think about pom-poms, because they’re fun, quick, easy, colorful and cheerful. I thought about trying to make heart-shaped pom-poms, but while I love the look of them they involve a lot of yarn waste. How to make two-color yarn pom-poms

So how could I make regular pom-poms a little more fun? By making two-color pom-poms, of course!

What You’ll Need

  • yarn (I used three different colors of Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride Worsted, left over from a book project)
  • pom-pom maker (I used my plastic one from Clover, which I like for consistency, but you can cut rings out of cardboard or just wrap the yarn around cardboard or your fingers (see the heart shaped tutorial above)
  • sharp scissors

What You’ll Do open yarn pom pom maker

  1. Wrap the yarn around the pom-pom maker. If using a commercial one or cardboard rings, wrap one color on one side and one on the other. For the cardboard or finger wrapped version, wrap about half your wraps in one color and half in the other. ready to finish pompom
  2. Cut the loops and tie a piece of yarn around the center to hold in place. I like to tie one knot, turn around and tie another on the other side. two color yarn pompom
  3. Fluff. Trim. Repeat.

There’s something kind of meditative about making pom-poms, and it’s a great way to use up bits of yarn. Mine are pink for Valentine’s Day and because I’m the mom of a daughter, but you could use any yarn you have and make them whatever colors you like. two color pompoms

I feel a mess of pom-pom making coming on (and mess is an appropriate adjective). And maybe an investment in a heart-shaped pom-pom maker.

Do you love pom-poms? Have you ever decorated with them? I’d love to hear about it!

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