Knit a Scarf to #givewarmth


Because I’m a knitter from way back, when I think about making scarves to #givewarmth, I naturally want to knit a scarf.

Or a bunch of scarves. The knit scarf is perfect for knitters of all skill levels and is a quick and easy way to #givewarmth.

It happens that I’m also feeling a need to burn through as much of my yarn stash as possible (probably because it is pretty much all in my office right now, so I’m staring at it all the time), so knitting and crocheting scarves can help me use more of it more quickly, and everyone needs a scarf, right?

How to Knit a Scarf

Of course there are a gillion scarf knitting patterns out there, but this particular one — which is more of a method rather than a pattern — is great for knitting a bunch of scarves quickly to give as gifts or to donate to people in need.

Depending on the size you make, you can knit one in an hour, or certainly in a day. I’ve been knitting while I ride the exercise bike lately, and I can definitely knit a kid-sized scarf in the time it takes to watch an episode of Orange is the New Black (which I am finally almost done with). The knit scarf is perfect for knitters of all skill levels and is a quick and easy way to #givewarmth.

All you need to knit this scarf is knowledge of casting on, the knit stitch and binding off, so it’s perfect for knitters of all skill levels.

The equipment you will need includes three balls of yarn and a pair of size 50 US/25 mm knitting needles.

When choosing your yarn, you’ll probably want a mix of textures, and maybe also of colors. Many of mine use Lion Brand Homespun, which is fluffy and fuzzy and soft but I don’t love working with it on its own, so it’s nice to combine with some smoother fibers. The knit scarf is perfect for knitters of all skill levels and is a quick and easy way to #givewarmth.

Using at least one bulky yarn is nice because it makes the scarf warmer. But really you can use anything in your stash, and three is not a magic number — and actually the first one of these scarves I ever made was four shades of green, so do whatever you want.

Giant Garter Stitch Scarf Knitting Pattern

Holding all three strands of yarn together, cast on anywhere from 6 to 12 stitches. Six is good for a child’s sized scarf or a skinnier adult scarf. I often do 8 or 10 for an adult, or 12 if I want a really big scarf.

Knit to your desired length, until you’re about to run out of one of the colors of yarn you are using, or whenever it feels done.

A nice rule of thumb is that a scarf should be at least as long as the person wearing it is tall, but scarves can really be any length you want, and probably should be shorter for kids.

I’ve done anything from 3 feet long for kids to more than 7 feet long for adults.

Bind off loosely. Weave in all ends.

These scarves are so fun because they are the best in quick, easy, mindless knitting but they also give you a chance to play with colors. I adore the turquoise, hot pink and black one on the needles above, which is probably a color combination I wouldn’t have made in a sweater, but it’s really fun for accessories. The knit scarf is perfect for knitters of all skill levels and is a quick and easy way to #givewarmth.

But I also love the understated shades of blue scarf, and this little red and purple one for a little one. Every scarf comes out different, even if you use the same yarn, and they’re all great.

Some of these are going to husband’s coworkers, others might end up with the girl’s teachers, or donated somewhere, or on etsy.

Right now I’m just having a lot of fun with these simple knit scarves, and I hope you’ll give them a try, too. There’s nothing better than knowing you can knit a scarf in a day when you need one!

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